Yankee Quill

For more than 50 years the New England Academy of Journalists has been honoring our region’s most extraordinary journalists for their contributions to a free press and their efforts to improve the communities they serve. Other journalism associations bestow awards for individual and team accomplishments, but the Yankee Quill recognizes the lifetime achievement of those who have had a broad influence for good, both inside and outside the newsroom. The Academy, which is comprised of all Quill winners and representatives of various New England journalism organizations, gathers annually under the auspices of the New England Society of News Editors Foundation to select the honorees. Winners are selected from among nominees that represent newspapers, broadcasting and academia. Click here to see the full list of Yankee Quill Award winners.

Yankee Quill nominations are due in the Spring. The award ceremony will take place at the Yankee Quill Dinner in October. Download Nomination form

2016 Yankee Quill Recipients

Edward Achorn
VP/Editorial Pages of The Providence Journal

Maura Casey
Editorial Writer at The Hartford Courant and The New York Times

Brian McGrory
Editor of The Boston Globe

Lincoln McKie Jr.
Journalism Professor at Northeastern University
Former Executive Editor of the Lowell Sun
Managing Editor of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette

Sarah Josepha Hale
19th Century Poet, Writer and Magazine Editor

Press Release

Four journalists, 19th century editor honored with 2016 Yankee Quill awards

Four New England journalists will receive the Yankee Quill award this fall for their contributions to the betterment of journalism in the six-state region.

The 2016 honorees are Edward Achorn, vice president/editorial pages, The Providence Journal; Maura Casey, editorial writer at The Hartford Courant and The New York Times; Brian McGrory, editor of The Boston Globe, and Lincoln McKie Jr., journalism professor at Northeastern University and former executive editor of the Lowell Sun and managing editor of the Worcester Telegram & Gazette.

In addition, the Academy of New England Journalists posthumously honors Sarah Josepha Hale, 19th century poet, writer and magazine editor from Newport, N.H., as a historic figure in journalism. She is known as the "Mother of Thanksgiving, author of "Mary Had a Little Lamb" and ardent supporter of girls' education in the early 19th century. Last year, the academy honored Mary Baker Eddy, founder of the Christian Science Monitor.

The Yankee Quill is presented annually by the Academy of New England Journalists through the auspices of the New England Society of News Editors. It is considered the highest individual honor awarded by fellow journalists in the region. Selection for the award is not based on any single achievement but rather on the broad influence for good over the course of a career.

Achorn receives the Quill for his commitment to fighting waste and corruption in government with powerful editorials that made a difference, advocating for the underprivileged when few others stepped up, and spreading the word in public speaking and teaching about the value of an informed citizenry to a democratic society.

Casey is presented the Quill for her passionate commitment to First Amendment rights, and her key involvement in arranging journalism exchange programs for New England editors with their counterparts in Russia and Iran. She has also worked as editorial page editor at The Eagle-Tribune in Lawrence, Mass., and associate editorial page editor at The Day, New London, Conn.

McGrory receives the Yankee Quill for his strong commitment to accountability journalism that has made a difference in Boston and beyond, his leadership in bringing the region's largest newspaper smartly into the 21st century of digital journalism in the face of formidable industry challenges, and his record of rigorously upholding the principle of a free press and the right of the public to access government records and attend public meetings.

McKie is honored for his work in Worcester and Lowell and the Journal Transcript Newspapers in suburban Boston. He is praised for his contribution to journalism education at Northeastern University by bringing a practical voice to training students for the real world of news, exposing them to valuable experience by assigning them to cover journalism meeting and producing the bulletin of the New England Newspaper and Press Association.

The Yankee Quill awards will be presented as part of the annual conferences of the New England Society of News Editors and the New England Newspaper and Press Association on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 6 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Natick, Mass.

For further information contact:

Bill Ketter, chairman, Academy of New England Journalists, (978) 946-2233 wketter@cnhi.com

George Geers, clerk, Academy of New England Journalists (603) 785-4811 / gnews@empire.net


Nomination instructions for Yankee Quill


The New England Society of Newspaper Editors Foundation recognizes the efforts and dedication of those in New England who have had a broad influence for good in the field of journalism with the Yankee Quill award.

Recipients are inducted into the Academy of New England Journalists upon receiving the Yankee Quill award.

Yankee Quill rules state that selection for the award is not based on a single distinguished achievement in news reporting or editorial writing, or on the development of a publication of purely local impact. Rather, election recognizes the effort and dedication of those in New England who have had a broad influence for good in the field of journalism.

In other words, it is not based on a single distinguished achievement in reporting, writing or editing or on the fact that someone runs a good newspaper or broadcast show or station. Instead, it honors a lifetime of contribution to the profession. Nominations may range across the entire field of journalism, including daily and weekly newspapers, radio and television news coverage and other forms of communications that meet the tests of journalism.

The Board of Trustees of the Academy of New England Journalists, along with the presidents of several New England media associations, will make the final selection of the persons to receive the Yankee Quill Award.

Yankee Quill
c/o NENPA
370 Common Street - 3rd Floor, Suite 319
Dedham, MA 02026

For further information contact: Bill Ketter, academy chairman, The Eagle-Tribune, wketter@cnhi.com / (978) 685-1000. George Geers, academy clerk, gnews@empire.net / (603) 785-4811


 

2015 Yankee Quill Recipients

Carolyn Lumsden
Opinion Editor of the Hartford Courant

Tom Farragher
Columnist/Associate Editor of the Boston Globe

Jane Harrigan
Former Managing Editor of the Concord Monitor/
Journalism Professor at UNH

Mary Jane Wilkinson
Former President of the New England First Amendment Coalition/
Retired Managing Editor of the Boston Globe

Mary Baker Eddy
Founder of the Christian Science Monitor

Press Release

Four New England journalists will receive the Yankee Quill award this fall for their contributions to the betterment of journalism in the six-state region.

The 2015 honorees are Carolyn Lumsden, opinion editor of the Hartford Courant; Tom Farragher, columnist and associate editor of the Boston Globe; Jane Harrigan, former managing editor of the Concord Monitor and longtime journalism professor at the University of New Hampshire, and Mary Jane Wilkinson, former president of the New England First Amendment Coalition and retired managing editor of the Boston Globe.

In addition, the Academy of New England Journalists posthumously honors Mary Baker Eddy, founder of the Christian Science Monitor, as a historic figure in New England journalism.

The Yankee Quill is presented annually by the Academy of New England Journalists through the auspices of the New England Society of News Editors. It is considered the highest individual honor awarded by fellow journalists in the region. Selection for the award is not based on any single achievement but rather on the broad influence for good over the course of a career.

Farragher receives the Quill for his commitment to the watchdog principles of journalism, leadership role in mentoring aspiring and young journalists, and fierce dedication to the First Amendment.

Harrigan is honored for her lifetime success in training aspiring and professional journalists, special journalism competency as a professor at the University of New Hampshire, and commitment to quality news content as city editor and managing editor of the Concord Monitor.

Lumsden is recognized for her strong commitment to open records and greater access to courtrooms, including leading the charge to allow cameras to record trials, and her efforts to diversify the opinion pages of the Courant with the voices of people of color.

Wilkinson receives her Yankee Quill award for leadership and mentoring as a longtime news executive at the Boston Globe, commitment to in-depth journalism that serves the public interest, and special contribution to the creation of the New England First Amendment Coalition.

Since its founding in 1908, The Christian Science Monitor has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize seven times. Mary Baker Eddy created the Monitor in response to vicious and untruthful attacks against her and her religion, Christian Science, from Joseph Pulitzer's New York World. The sensationalism of the World forced Eddy to defend herself and her religion in court, with the case ultimately dismissed. Not satisfied with that victory, Eddy determined that to counteract the "yellow" press of the time, she needed to start her own daily newspaper. One hundred days later, the Christian Science Monitor was launched as a nondenominational daily newspaper free from sensationalism and constructive in emphasis, "to injure no man, but to bless all mankind."

The Yankee Quill awards will be presented as part of the annual conferences of the New England Society of News Editors and the New England Newspaper and Press Association on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 8 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Natick, Mass.

For further information contact:

Bill Ketter, chairman, Academy of New England Journalists, (978) 946-2233 wketter@cnhi.com

George Geers, clerk, Academy of New England Journalists (603) 785-4811 / gnews@empire.net

2014 Yankee Quill Recipients

Joe Bergantino
Director of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting

Karen Bordeleau
Executive Editor of the Providence Journal

John Christie
Editor of the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting

Richard Lodge
Editor of The MetroWest Daily News, Framingham MA

Alan White
Editor of The Eagle-Tribune, North Andover MA

Press Release

Five journalists honored with 2014 Yankee Quill Awards

Five New England journalists will receive the Yankee Quill Award this fall for their contributions to the betterment of journalism in the six-state region.

The Yankee Quill Award is presented annually by the Academy of New England Journalists through the auspices of the New England Society of New Editors Foundation. It is considered the highest individual honor awarded by fellow journalists in the region. Selection for the award is not based on any single achievement but rather on the broad influence for good over the course of a career.

The 2014 honorees are Joe Bergantino, director, New England Center for Investigative Reporting; Karen Bordeleau, executive editor, The Providence Journal; John Christie, editor, Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting; Richard Lodge, editor, MetroWest Daily News, Framingham, Mass. and Alan White, editor, The Eagle-Tribune, North Andover, Mass.

Joe Bergantino was cited for his contributions to investigative journalism as a reporter and editor for 23 years at WBZ-TV, and the co-founding of the New England Center for Investigative Reporting at Boston University five years ago. The selection committee was impressed with his “passion for holding people of power, money and influence accountable to the public, and for your commitment to training the next generation of watchdog journalists through NECIR programs.”

Karen Bordeleau began her career at The Providence Journal as a copy editor and reporter in 1996 and, last year, became the first woman at the paper to work as senior vice president and executive editor. Previously she was editor of The Kent County Daily Times and the The Call in Rhode Island. She is a past president of the New England Associated Press News Executives Association and the New England Society of News Editors. Bordeleau was cited by the Quill committee for her strong commitment to the guide dog and watchdog principles of journalism, leadership role in training and mentoring journalists in Rhode Island and from other countries, and fierce dedication to press freedom.

John Christie was a reporter and editor at several papers in Massachusetts and Maine; editor-in-chief of the Beverly Times in Massachusetts, and vice president for strategic planning general manager, deputy managing editor, writing coach and metro editor at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, before becoming publisher of Maine’s Kennebec Journal and Morning Sentinel in 2000. In 2009, he founded the Maine Center for Public Interest Reporting, which has produced more than 150 investigative stories about Maine state and local government. Christie was cited for his “commitment to the core principles and obligations of a free press” and his role in the founding and nurturing of the Maine center.

Richard Lodge, who also serves as editor-in-chief of GateHouse Media’s west unit, has edited papers in Lowell, New Bedford, Southbridge and Newton, Mass., in addition to Portland, Maine. He is vice president of the New England Society of News Editors. Lodge was selected for his commitment to the growth and development of meaningful community journalism, record of honing the skills of young journalists, and leadership role in both professional and community issues. The committee was also impressed with his dedication to fighting for open meetings, open records and the public’s right to know.

Alan White has a lengthy career at the Eagle-Tribune and has worked as reporter, city editor, assistant managing editor, managing editor and editor. His contributions at the paper include two Pulitzer Prizes and active leadership in the greater Lawrence community. The selection committee cited White’s role in watchdog community journalism, training of young journalists who went on to achieve significant career success, and unswerving commitment to transparency in government. The selection committee was also impressed with his contribution to The Eagle-Tribune’s outreach efforts over the years to encourage the Latino and Anglo populations of Lawrence and environs to better understand each other and their common civic purpose as citizens and immigrants. The Yankee Quill awards will be presented as part of the annual conferences of the New England Society of News Editors and the New England Newspaper & Press Association on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 9 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Natick, Mass.

2013 Yankee Quill Recipients

Christine Chinlund
Managing Editor of The Boston Globe

Peter Lord
Environmental Reporter and Editor of the Providence Journal

James Rousmaniere
Editor and President of the Keene Sentinel

Eliot White
Publisher and Owner of the Record-Journal, Meriden CT

John Greenleaf Whittier
19th-century poet and writer, newspaper editor

Press Release

Four journalists, John Greenleaf Whittier honored with 2013 Yankee Quill Awards

Four contemporary New England journalists and the 19th-century newspaper writer and editor, who would become one of America’s most-beloved poets will receive the Yankee Quill Award this fall for their career contributions to the betterment of journalism in the six-state region.

The Yankee Quill Award is presented annually by the Academy of New England Journalists through the auspices of the New England Society of Newspaper Editors Foundation. It is considered the highest individual honor awarded by fellow journalists in the region.

The 2013 honorees are Christine Chinlund, managing editor of The Boston Globe; the late Peter Lord, long-time environmental reporter and editor at the Providence Journal; James Rousmaniere, recently retired editor and president of the Keene (NH) Sentinel, and Eliot White, publisher and owner of the Record-Journal in Meriden, CT.

In addition, the award will be presented posthumously to John Greenleaf Whittier, the 19th-century poet and writer from Massachusetts, who helped lead the slavery abolition movement in the north while working at a newspaper and as a reporter. Whittier became a major poet towards the end of his life, but supported himself as a writer and newspaper editor at papers in Haverhill, Boston, Hartford and as editor of the Pennsylvania Freeman where he risked his life when the paper was destroyed during an anti-abolitionist riot in 1838.

Christine Chinlund has been with the Boston Globe for 30 years. As managing editor for news, she oversees the Globe newsroom and is the resident counselor on questions of accuracy, ethics, and taste. Over the course of three decades at the Globe, Chinlund has covered politics, worked on the Spotlight Team, served as editor of the National and Foreign desks, and spent three years as the paper’s ombudsman. She will receive the Yankee Quill award for her "passion for accountability journalism, commitment to the highest journalist standards, and special connection to Globe readers."

Peter Lord, who died in 2012 after a 30-year career at the Providence Journal, worked as a reporter, bureau manager in Warwick and Westerly, and was a pioneering environmental journalist. His stories on lead poisoning in Rhode Island led to changes in state regulatory laws, and he was considered an expert on wetlands and coastal development, water pollution, Superfund sites, land conservation and whale rescues. Lord helped establish the Metcalf Institute for Marine and Environmental Reporting at the University of Rhode Island. He is honored with the Yankee Quill for "his masterful mentoring of aspiring journalists and involvement in establishing the Metcalf Institute for the enrichment of environmental reporting."

James Rousmaniere, recently retired as editor and president after a 35 year career at the Keene Sentinel and nearly a decade at the Baltimore Sun. He has served as president of the New England Newspaper Association, worked on technology committees with the Newspaper Association of America and the board of the Washington-based International Center for Journalists, and hosted journalists from economically developing nations for training at the Sentinel. He has provided journalism and news management advice to publishers and other media in other lands, in addition to being in the forefront of local news coverage in the Keene area. Rousmaniere will receive the Yankee Quill for "his efforts to expand literacy in and bring Internet connectivity to the Monadnock region, and to share his knowledge of the value and importance of an independent press with journalists in emerging nations."

Eliot White is the fourth-generation CEO of the family-owned newspaper company that publishes two daily —the Record-Journal in Meriden and the Westerly (RI) Sun— and several weekly newspapers. As publisher and editor of the Meriden daily, he has made a strong commitment to local and watchdog journalism and has been a strong supporter of open government initiatives, including Connecticut’s Freedom of Information laws. He is a former president of the New England Newspaper Association and the Connecticut Daily Newspaper Association and numerous local organizations. White will be presented the Yankee Quill award for his "commitment to open government initiatives and to diversity, including internships to aspiring minority newspapermen and women." His father, Carter H. White, was presented the Yankee Quill in 1990.

The Yankee Quill awards will be presented as part of the annual conferences of the New England Society of Newspaper Editors and the New England Newspaper and Press Association on the evening of Thursday, Oct. 10 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Natick, MA.

Contact info: Bill Ketter, chairman, Academy of New England Journalists, (978) 946-2233 wketter@cnhi.com and George Geers, clerk, Academy of New England Journalists (603) 785-4811 / gnews@empire.net

2012 Yankee Quill Winners

Robert Giles
Former curator of the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University

R. John Mitchell
Publisher and owner of the Rutland Herald and The Barre Montpelier Times-Argus of Vermont

Robert Schrepf
Former longtime editorial page editor of The Hartford Courant

Robert Turner
Former deputy editorial page editor of The Boston Globe

Jack Williams
Veteran television journalist and news anchor at WBZ-TV in Boston

Press Release

Five journalists honored with 2012 Yankee Quill Awards Five New England journalists will receive the Yankee Quill Award this fall for their contributions to the betterment of journalism in the six-state region.

The Yankee Quill Award is presented annually by the Academy of New England Journalists through the auspices of the New England Society of Newspaper Editors Foundation. It is considered the highest individual honor awarded by fellow journalists in the region.

The 2012 honorees are Robert Giles, former curator of the Nieman Foundation at Harvard University; R. John Mitchell, publisher and owner of the Rutland Herald and The Barre Montpelier Times-Argus of Vermont; Robert Schrepf, former longtime editorial page editor of The Hartford Courant; Robert Turner, former deputy editorial page editor of The Boston Globe, and Jack Williams, veteran television journalist and news anchor at WBZ-TV in Boston.

The Yankee Quill selection committee is made up of previous Yankee Quill winners who are members of the Academy of New England Journalists and representatives of the various New England journalism organizations.

Selection for the award is not based on any single achievement but rather the recipients' broad influence for good on New England journalism.

The committee was impressed with Giles' 11 years at the helm of Harvard University's Nieman Foundation, including its outreach programs such as the digital journalism lab, the watchdog reporting website and encouragement of narrative journalism. Mitchell was noted for his career contributions to Vermont journalism through advocacy for open government and editorial courage that included his Rutland paper winning a Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for a series of editorials on civil unions. The committee was impressed with Turner's rich involvement with the Boston community as well as his journalistic achievements that included years of political reporting and editing. Schrepf was cited for his influential editorial writing career at the Courant and his active involvement with the New England Society of Newspaper Editors and Connecticut Foundation for Open Government. Williams' was honored for his longtime career as a broadcast reporter and anchor and for his commitment to community through the "Wednesday's Child" adoption program and other public service programs.

The Yankee Quill awards will be presented as part of the annual conference of the New England Society of Newspaper Editors in November.

Contact info: Bill Ketter, chairman, Academy of New England Journalists, (978) 946-2233 wketter@cnhi.com and George Geers, clerk, Academy of New England Journalists (603) 785-4811 / gnews@empire.net

2011 Yankee Quill Winners

Jack Authelet
Foxboro Reporter in Foxboro, MA

Leah Lamson
Telegram & Gazette in Worcester, MA

Irwin Gratz
NPR “Morning Edition” in Portland, ME

Kendall Wallace
The Sun in Lowell, MA

Gen. Charles H. Taylor (posthumous)
The Boston Globe in Boston, MA

2011 Yankee Quill Award Winners


For more information, please contact:
Megan Sherman
m.sherman@nenpa.com
781.320.8042

Promoting Growth and Excellence in New England Newspapers since 1950